Cruce Tectum

Cruce tectum, hidden under the cross, a blog for Epiphany Lutheran Church, Dorr, Michigan

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Location: Moscow, Idaho

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost

Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost (A—Proper 19)

September 14, 2014
Text: Matt. 18:21-35

            It is pretty outrageous.  In fact, it’s downright infuriating.  Here this wicked servant has been forgiven all his debt, ten thousand talents, whether of gold or silver, an unimaginable amount that he could never pay off if he worked his whole life.  And he turns around and demands that his fellow-servant pay back what is, relatively speaking, a rather minor debt, a hundred denarii.  And when the fellow servant can’t pay, the first servant has him thrown into debtor’s prison.  Having been forgiven much, the servant failed to forgive even a little.  Now, the other servants were obviously disturbed.  They went and told the master everything.  “Then his master summoned him and said to him, ‘You wicked servant!  I forgave you all that debt because you pleaded with me.  And should you not have had mercy on your fellow servant, as I had mercy on you?’” (Matt. 18:32-33; ESV).  The moral of the story is clear.  Having been forgiven, you should forgive.  Having received mercy, you should have mercy on your neighbor.  And keep in mind what God has forgiven you.  He has forgiven you so much more than you’ll ever have to forgive your neighbor.  Like the ten thousand talents, roughly the wages for 60 million days of work, forgiven by the master as if there never was a debt.  Verses 100 denarii, roughly 100 days of work, significant, but not in comparison with the 60 million days.  Yet the wicked servant will not forgive this.  You see the absurdity and downright wickedness of it in the illustration.  And yet, is this not a picture of what you do when you fail to forgive your neighbor?  Here you’ve been forgiven all your sins: your rejection of God, your adulterous addiction to other gods (the people and things you fear, love, and trust above Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), the hatred you harbor toward your neighbor, your wandering eyes and your heart full of lust and covetousness, your loose tongue, not to mention every skeleton that you know would fall out of your closet if we opened the door to take a peek.  All the secrets you’ve hidden in the darkness.  God knows them all.  And He forgives you.  For all of it.  Because of Christ.  Because of His saving work for you.  But your neighbor said something mean.  Or disagreed with your politics.  Or betrayed a confidence.  Whatever it was, he hurt you.  And one thing is certain: You’ll never forgive him for it.
            Repent.  You are the wicked servant.  You’ve been forgiven a debt you could never possibly repay, not even with 60 million days of hard labor.  That’s the point.  It is impossible to pay for your own sins.  It took the death of God to pay for your sins.  It took the blood and death of Jesus on the cross.  And He willingly paid it.  He willingly suffered all of this for you.  You don’t deserve it.  You aren’t worthy of it.  But He did it anyway.  Because He loves you.  Because He’s just that good.  So now, on the basis of His forgiving your unimaginable debt, you are to forgiven your neighbor’s minor (and even not so minor) infractions.  And as bad as your neighbor’s sins against you may be (and there are some pretty horrendous sins we humans perpetrate against one another), recognize that they pale in comparison with your own sins against God.  Christ died for you.  Christ died for your neighbor.  Your sins are forgiven by God in Christ.  Your neighbor’s sins are forgiven by God in Christ.  God loves you.  God loves your neighbor.  If God forgives your neighbor, who are you to hold his sin against him?  If God loves your neighbor, who are you to despise him?  If God forgives even you, who are you to withhold forgiveness from another? 
            Now, what is forgiveness?  First of all, this is what it is not.  It is not a feeling in your heart.  Forgiving your neighbor doesn’t mean you feel all warm and fuzzy about him.  Of course, bitter feelings are sinful, and you should repent of them.  But forgiveness is not a feeling.  Forgiveness is a decision.  It is a decision not to hold your neighbor’s sin against him.  It is a decision to pray for your neighbor’s welfare, pray that God would bless him, pray that God would forgive him and give him faith in Christ.  And it is a decision not to seek the retribution your neighbor’s sin deserves.  On the other hand, forgiveness does not mean there aren’t temporal consequences for sin.  If, God forbid, I drive drunk and kill someone in an accident, that person’s family may forgive me, but I still have to go to jail.  If, God forbid, someone does something to harm your children, you may forgive them, but you won’t ask them to babysit.  And yet, in spite of those temporal consequences, you pray God would spare the offender the eternal consequences of his sin.  Nor is forgiveness an act, a good face.  It is not sweeping something under the rug where no one can see it, but secretly holding on to it so that it festers inside of you into anger and hatred.  If you need to forgive your neighbor, and especially if you are struggling with it, here is what you do: Every day you thank God for that person, and you pray that God would bless him.  It well may disgust you to do it.  That’s okay.  Repent of your disgust.  And then do it anyway.  Forgiveness is something you practice.  Jesus tells you to love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you (Matt. 5:44), do good to those who hate you and bless those who curse you (Luke 6:27-28).  That is what it means to live in forgiveness, God’s for you, and yours for your neighbor.   
            Forgiveness is to loose from the bondage of guilt.  It is to set your neighbor free.  It is to release him.  It is to untie him, let him go, send his sin away, like God did for the Israelites with the scapegoat.  The priest would lay his hands on the goat, confess the sins of the people over it, and then send it out into the wilderness.  The sins of the people were literally sent away.  This, of course, was a type of Christ.  This is what our Lord Jesus did for us, taking our sins upon Himself as the Scapegoat, bearing them out of the city, up the hill, onto the wood, lifted up before God as the Bearer of all our sins.  To forgive is to have mercy, as Joseph does for his brothers in our Old Testament (Gen. 50:15-21).  These brothers had thrown Joseph into a pit and ignored his cries for help as they sat down for lunch to consider what to do with him.  They thought about murdering him.  But instead, they sold him to Midianite slave traders, sold their own flesh and blood into Egyptian slavery.  Well, things worked out well in the end for Joseph, because God took care of him.  But they only worked out well after false accusations of rape and hard labor in prison.  Still, Joseph does the Christian thing.  He forgives his brothers.  He feeds them.  He provides for them.  He looses them from the chains of their guilt.  “‘As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good, to bring it about that many people should be kept alive, as they are today.  So do not fear; I will provide for you and your little ones.’  Thus he comforted them and spoke kindly to them” (Gen. 50:20-21). 
            Now, there is something in Joseph’s story that clues you in to why you can freely forgive your neighbor his trespasses against you.  You can do so because you know that promise that God will work all things, even evil perpetrated against you, for your good.  That is what St. Paul writes: “we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose” (Rom. 8:28).  So even if your neighbor means evil against you, God means it for your good.  And He will take care of you.  He may not make you the ruler of a country, and you may not know how He has worked everything out for your good until you get to heaven, but you’ll see it then.  Then you’ll know.  That’s just what He does.  That’s the promise.
            But there is an even greater reason you can forgive.  You can forgive because Christ, who died for you, and who is risen from the dead for you, lives in you.  More importantly, you live in Him.  He gives you His resurrection life in your Baptism into Him, the life that He won.  And how did He win it?  By forgiving you.  By dying for your forgiveness.  That’s how He won it.  So with that life in you, you can forgive.  You can be merciful.  You can love those who have sinned against you.  Because even your lack of love and your inability to forgive has been covered in the blood of the Savior.  Don’t miss the order, here.  God doesn’t forgive you because you’ve first forgiven your neighbor.  You forgive your neighbor because God has first forgiven you.  The servant could have forgiven the debt of his neighbor because the master had first forgiven him.  You forgive because God has first forgiven you.  You forgive your neighbor for the sake of Christ who died to win that forgiveness.

            How often?  As many as seven times?  (Peter thinks he’s being rather generous, by the way, and by human standards, he is!)  Not seven times, but seventy times seven.  And even more.  Don’t keep track.  Because the beautiful Good News is that God doesn’t keep track of your sins.  He doesn’t put a limit on the forgiveness He extends to you.  Every time you sin, you are forgiven.  Every time you repent, you are absolved.  Every time.  No exceptions.  Not because you deserve it.  Not because your repentance is “really sincere.”  Not because you’ve proven yourself worthy of a second, third, or four billionth chance.  Because of Christ.  Always and only because of Christ.  In fact, let’s put it this way.  Whatever your neighbor has done to you, charge it all to Christ’s account.  That’s what God has done.  That’s what He does for you.  Jesus has paid for it all, all of your neighbor’s sins against you, all of your sins against your neighbor, paid for it all right there on the cross.  So it is done.  You are forgiven.  Your neighbor is forgiven.  You are both loosed.  You are free.  As our Lord said from the cross about your sin and your neighbor’s: “It is finished” (John 19:30).  In the Name of the Father, and of the Son (+), and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.     

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