Cruce Tectum

Cruce tectum, hidden under the cross, a blog for Epiphany Lutheran Church, Dorr, Michigan

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Location: Moscow, Idaho

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Tenth Sunday after Pentecost

Tenth Sunday after Pentecost (A—Proper 15)

August 17, 2014
Text: Matt. 15:21-28

            Jesus just ignores her.  He does not answer her a word (Matt. 15:23).  Just keeps on walking.  And she keeps begging.  “Have mercy on me, O Lord, Son of David” (v. 22; ESV).  Her daughter is severely oppressed by a demon.  If anyone can help, it is Jesus.  The woman must know something of Him.  Though she’s a Canaanite and not a Jew, she must have heard of Him, and she must know the Promise given to God’s people of the coming Messiah.  She calls Him “Son of David,” a messianic title.  In other words, she believes He’s the Savior.  And the Savior is in the business of crushing the serpent’s head (Gen. 3:15), casting out demons and conquering Satan.  So the woman cries to Him, pleads with Him, will not let Him go.  The disciples are getting annoyed.  “Lord, just help her out so she’ll leave us alone.”  I am not sure they are moved by compassion so much as the desire to be rid of her, escape her with a clean conscience.  But Jesus answers the disciples: “I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel” (Matt. 15:24).  Now, wait a second… Isn’t Jesus the Savior of all people?  Isn’t that the Promise we trace through the whole Old Testament, that He’ll be the Savior of the nations, that He’s for everybody?  Yes, of course.  That is the case now that His saving work has been fulfilled.  But in His earthly ministry, He was sent to preach and do miracles for the Israelites.  And, to be sure, it took guts for this Canaanite woman, a Syrophoenician, to address Jesus in the first place.  The Canaanites were the previous inhabitants of the Promised Land, the pagans, the antagonists of Israel.  There is some racial tension here, and Jesus highlights it in His answer.  He essentially tells her, “no!”  But she won’t let go.  If Jesus is the Messiah, He is here for her, and she is holding Him to it.  She throws herself in front of Him, stopping Him in His tracks.  Begging now on her knees, she prays simply and directly: “Lord, help me” (v. 25). 
            And that is your prayer, is it not?  In times of desperation?  In times of great distress, illness, or grief?  “Lord, help me.”  Sometimes there are no other words.  Now, sometimes the help is quick in coming.  Recovery.  Resolution.  Encouragement.  Comfort.  But sometimes the help seems not to come at all.  You’ve been there with the Canaanite woman, haven’t you?  And it’s not just racial tension between Jews and Gentiles that separate you from Jesus.  It is your sin.  You have separated yourself from God by your rejection of Him in your every sin.  So you know that you are not worthy for Jesus to hear you.  And often, He seems to ignore you.  It seems He does not answer you a word.  You beg Him, “Have mercy on me, O Lord, Son of David,” and He just keeps on walking.  He seems to reject you.  In the case of the Canaanite woman, He even calls her a dog: “It is not right to take the children’s bread and throw it to the dogs” (v. 26).  It is not right to take what belongs to the Jews and throw it to the pagan Gentiles.  In your case, he calls you what you are, a sinner.  It is not right to take what belongs to the righteous and throw it to sinners. 
            Ah, but just there He’s given you something to hold on to.  For Jesus came precisely to take what belongs to the righteous and give it to sinners.  Just as He came precisely to take what belongs to the Jews, namely, salvation in the Messiah, and give it to the whole world.  In calling the woman a dog, Jesus gives her a place in the house (Rev. Mark Love).  And she knows it.  She has caught Him in His Words, right where He desires to be caught.  “Yes, Lord, yet even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters’ table” (v. 27).  And so you.  In naming you a sinner, Jesus has given you your place in God’s house.  “Yes, Lord, yet you came precisely to save the sinner from His sin.  You came precisely to save me, to have mercy, to help me.”  You see, Jesus wants to be caught in His Word.  Hold Him to His Word!  Hold on to Him in His Word, and never let Him go.  That is faith.  And so, what does He say to the Canaanite?  “O woman, great is your faith!  Be it done for you as you desire” (v. 28).  And her daughter was healed from that hour.  The demon was cast out.  Satan was conquered.  The serpent felt the weight of Messiah on his head.
            Why does Jesus make the woman, make you, jump through so many hoops?  Why doesn’t He just deliver immediately when you ask?  We talked about that last week and we ultimately had to content ourselves with God’s answer to Job: “I’m God and you’re not, so just trust me that I know what I’m doing.”  In other words, we don’t know.  God hasn’t told us.  But we do know that in these situations Jesus, far from having abandoned you, is exercising your faith.  He wants you to hold Him to His Word.  He wants you to believe in spite of the evidence, because you have heard what He says in His Word.  He wants you to know your place in God’s house, as a sinner graciously given His salvation and His righteousness, without any merit or worthiness in yourself.  Jesus wants you to catch Him in His Word.
            So in those times when you are not immediately relieved of your suffering, when the sickness lingers, when the relationship ends, when the loved one dies, when you face your own death… It is then that Jesus wants you to catch Him in His Word.  He wants you to cling to His Promise.  Do you really think He is ignoring you, He who has purchased you to be His own by shedding His precious blood and dying for you on the cross?  Do you really think He refuses to answer to you a word, He who has given you the Holy Scriptures as the revelation of Himself in His grace and mercy?  Do you really think He has rejected you, He who has place God’s own holy Name on you in Baptism as we saw with little John this morning?  No, no.  He wants you to cling to precisely those things.  He wants you to throw yourself in front of Him and stop Him in His tracks, and, recognizing your complete helplessness and unworthiness, cling to Him for mercy: “Lord, help me.”  “Lord, I am a dog.  I am a poor, miserable sinner.  I confess it.  But You brought me into God’s House, made me His own.  You promised there is a place for me.  Just let me eat the crumbs.  Just let me sit at your feet at Your Table.  That’s why you came.  To have mercy on me.”  And then, like a dog sitting by the Master’s Table, wait expectantly for what He has to give you.
            He will help you.  But He will help you perfectly.  He will help you in the way He knows to be best, though it be a cross.  Maybe He will immediately relieve you.  He often does.  Then again, maybe He won’t relieve you until you close your eyes in death and open them in heaven.  That is actually a better help and healing than anything you can prescribe to Him.  And you have to remember that the perfect help and healing only come in the end, when Jesus raises you from the dead.  God may cure your cancer now, but you will still die.  God may restore your loved one to health now, but eventually you will have mourn a loss.  That is the reality of life in this sin-fallen world.  The Lord does have mercy.  The Lord does help.  But we often mistake His mercy and help for neglect.  Because we fail to see what Jesus Christ has finally done for the help of the Canaanite woman and her daughter, for you and me, and for the whole world.

            It is His death on the cross, where He bore our griefs and carried our sorrows, where He was stricken, smitten, and afflicted by God for our sins and the sins of the whole world (Is. 53:4-5).  You know why Jesus kept walking as the woman was begging?  He was walking on to complete His earthly ministry, walking on finally to Golgotha to help her, to save her, to save her precious little daughter, to cast out the demons forever.  He was walking on to save you.  And so in His death and in His resurrection, He provides for your help and healing in full measure.  He dies that you might live.  He lives that you might never die.  He is risen, and He will raise you, too, to live with Him, with all the saints, with the Canaanite woman and her daughter, in paradise restored, in the healthful creation of the new heavens and the new earth.  Jesus is not ignoring you, and His answer to you isn’t really “no.”  It is a bigger “yes” than your request.  It is the resurrection of the dead and the life of the world to come.  In the Name of the Father, and of the Son (+), and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.          

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